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What to do if you see a service dog doing their job

According to 'Bill 80, Ontario Service Dogs Act, 2016' a "service dog" means a dog that is trained as a guide for a person with a disability or that is receiving training to be such a guide, and that has the qualifications prescribed by the regulations made under this Act. The following is a set of dos and dont's should you encounter a service dog and their person. 

Respect service dogs and their handlers by following this simple etiquette guide!

These are a series of things you absolutely should do!

 

Do this

Speak to the handler when greeting a service dog team. 

Do this

Know service dog vests are not required by law, however, most service dogs wear a vest identifying them as such. 

Do this

Allow a service dog to work without distraction. 

And to keep in mind..

Know service dogs are valued and well-loved family members who enjoy their jobs. 

These are a series of things you absolutely should not do!

 

Don't do this

Speak to, pet, make eye contact or distract a service dog in any way, realizing by allowing a service dog to great you may distract the service dog from its work.

Don't do this

Be offended if a handler does not want to answer questions about life with a service dog. Keep in mind the handler may be trying to get someplace in a hurry.

Don't do this

Offer a service dog food

Don't do this

Feel bad for service dogs when you see them working in public. They get play time, attention, and love from their handlers and immediate family members.